Dr. Susanne Bennett

Nov 10, 2010

probioticsandskin

The largest organ in the human body is the skin and it protects our major internal organs from external pollutants, chemicals and more importantly from pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. Bacteriologist Theodor Rosebury estimates that 50 million individual bacteria live on the average square centimeter (5×107/cm2) of human skin, and if the skin flora is out of balance- basically there is an intense war of microbes going on!

To help reduce bacteria, virus and fungi growth on skin, I highly recommend using a probiotic soap without preservatives, fragrances, deodorants, or synthetic ingredients. Oral probiotics supplements aid in the digestion of foods and protects our intestinal environment against harmful microorganisms like yeasts, fungi, and parasites that can cause disease. Probiotic soap works similarly by keeping the balance of the microbes on skin, keeping the bad bugs such as fungi from overgrowth and optimizing the healthy bacteria to grow.

Hands down, the best probiotic soap I have every used is Dr. Iichiroh Ohhira’s Kampuku Beauty Bar, which includes natural plant extracts and herbs that replenish all types of skin. Dr. Ohhira is an award-winning microbiologist who has done extensive research in the field of lactic acid bacteria, along with other beneficial microorganisms. I wholeheartedly recommend using his product in any skin regimen, particularly for fungal infections such as athlete’s feet, jock itch, acne, oily skin, cradle cap, eczema and body odor. BTW- please do not share your soap with your loved ones; we each have our own unique skin flora.

Like many little things in life, the simple act of gently cleansing the skin can decrease mental and emotional stress, leaving you feeling restored, refreshed, and more than anything—clean!

References:
http://www.omx2u.com/ohhira.asp
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/probiotics/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-susanne-bennett/a-bath-a-week-for-better-_b_775696.html

Article Source: http://luxuryholistics.com/2010/11/probiotics-and-skin/